Crochet Tutorial: Learn How To Crochet The Alpine Stitch Pattern Photo & Video Tutorial

February 12, 2019
     If you are looking for a solid, textured and versatile stitch for your project that looks beautiful from both sides, you are in the right place. The alpine stitch creates a beautiful textured diamond shape on one side and a flat defined pattern on the other side.


     In this tutorial I will show you step by step how to create the alpine stitch with detailed photos and explanation and a video at the end for those who find it easier to learn by watching how is it done.


THIS YEAR I DECIDED TO DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY AND SO, ALL MY PREMIUM PATTERNS WILL BE FREE FOR THE FIRST 3 DAYS FROM RELEASE

FOLLOW MY FACEBOOK PAGE TO BE NOTIFIED WHEN OTHER PATTERNS GO LIVE AND YOU WON'T MISS OUT AGAIN

OR FIND THE INEXPENSIVE PATTERNS IN MY ETSY STORE and RAVELRY STORE


     The alpine stitch is versatile enough to be used is all kinds of projects such as blankets, scarves, hats, jumpers, toys and more.

     It is suitable for beginners to intermediate crocheters as it uses basic stitches such as single crochet and double crochet stitches. All special stitches are explained in detail.

     The raised bumpy texture creates a diamond shaped pattern and can be used to replicate the texture of fur when making animal toys.

     Take a look at my 3in1 Woodland Fox Baby Blanket to see how I used this stitch to mimic the fur of a fox.


Looking for similar textured stitches? See my other tutorials below: 




Pin it for later


     Before we continue, please note that this post contains affiliate links, I will earn a small percentage should you choose to purchase something, but it will be at no cost to you. You can read the disclosure policy here.

Supplies I Used

- Marriner Yarn DK (light worsted yarn) in oat

     Unfortunately MarrinerYarns is only found in the UK, so for my international customers, I can recommend a similar yarn, Red Heart Yarn , which comes is a multitude of colors and weights, just as affordable and easy to work with as Marriner Yarns.

- 4mm crochet hook



     I get most of my crochet supplies from Amazon, it's fast and easy and I find everything I need in one place. 

     I also invested in Amazon Prime Membership which makes most of shipping free and deliveries super fast.

Crochet Terms

The pattern is written in US terms


- sc (single crochet)

- dc (double crochet)

- yo (yarn over)

- sk (skip one stitch)

- fpdc (front post double crochet


Special Stitches:


Front Post Double Crochet(See photo tutorial below) Yarn over (2 loops on hook), insert hook from front to back behind the double crochet post below (in this case the double crochet is 2 rows below), yarn over and pull up a long loop (3 loops on hook), yarn over and pull through 2 loops (2 loops on hook), yarn over and pull through the last remaining loops.

Crocheting The Alpine Stitch


     The pattern consists of a repeat of 4 rows (technically it's 2 but the 2nd and 4th rows need individual explanation to make it easier for beginner crocheters to understand).

     The pattern requires an even number of chains (29ch +1 that counts as the first sc in the next row)

     The front post double crochet stitch (fpdc) is worked in the dc right below it, 2 rows down (because the row right below it is a single crochet row).

     If you are a tight crocheter, use one size larger hook to make the foundation chain and row (in this case I used a 4.5mm hook, then a 4mm hook to complete the blanket).


As a useful rule of thumb:

- if the stitch below is a dc, then fpdc in it, if it's a fpdc, then make dc

- the pattern is a repeat of sc rows and dc/fpdc rows

- due to the way the pattern is made, one row of dc/fpdc will start with (dc, fpdc) and end with (fpdc, dc) and the following row of dc/fpdc will start and end with 2dc

- because you are fpdc in the dc below, there will be an unused stitch left behind the fpdc. When you are making the next dc, you should skip that stitch

- start and end the blanket with a row of sc, it will look neat and balanced



Row 1: ch30


Row 2: sc in 3rd ch from hook and across, turn



Row 3: ch3 (counts as a dc), dc in the following stitch and across, turn



Row 4: ch1 (counts as a sc), sc in the following stitch and across, turn



Row 5: ch3 (counts as a dc), *fpdc, skip the stitch left behind the fpdc and dc*, repeat ** until the end of the row, turn (your last two stitches should be (fpdc, dc), in that order)








Row 6: ch1 (counts as a sc), sc in the following stitch and across, turn


Row 7: ch3 (counts as a dc), dc in the following stitch, *fpdc, sk the stitch behind the fpdc and dc* repeat across until you have one remaining stitch to make, dc in the last stitch, turn (your last two stitches should be 2dc just like the beginning of the row)







Repeat rows 4,5,6 & 7 until you have the required length making sure to end in a row of sc stitches. Here is how the pattern looks like on the right side and the wrong side.



Video Tutorial

For those who learn better from watching videos, I've made a video tutorial to show you how to crochet the beautiful bead stitch.


Follow my Youtube Channel for more tutorials like this one. 



I hope you find my tutorial easy to follow, don't forget to follow me on social media (links in the side bar) for more free tutorials.


And, as you might know by now, all my premium crochet patterns are free for the first 3 days only from release, so don't forget to follow my Facebook Page to be notified when the patterns are posted so you won't miss out.


Happy Crocheting!

4 comments:

  1. Thank you for this. I have been looking for a tutorial that I can follow for these two stitches.

    ReplyDelete
  2. how would you increase with this stitch? Want to make hooded scarf and want to widen it at the hood part. Thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't tried it yet, but I guess it'll have to be an odd number of increased stitches per row. Might be a bit tricky

      Delete
  3. I love this stitch! Thank you so much for sharing it!

    ReplyDelete

Powered by Blogger.